Wednesday, October 17, 2012

I cooked: Wagyu Beef Teriyaki

Being able to cook for my parents and share good food with them gives me great satisfaction. Whenever I get the chance, I will cook them a nice meal. My parents are particularly fond of teriyaki sauce so since I can now make my own teriyaki sauce, I bought two pieces of Australian Wagyu steak to make beef teriyaki for them.



Round steak is a non-premium cut, but because it comes from the Wagyu breed, it has a small (decent) amount of marbling. This cut of meat is flavorful and tender at the same time. For me personally,I would prefer to buy a non-premium cut from a Wagyu breed than a premium cut from say Black Angus. 



After lots of experimentation, my favorite method for cooking steaks now is using Heston Blumenthal's "Perfect Steak Recipe". Using Heston's method, one has to flip the steak every 15-20 seconds and repeat this to the desired doneness. According to Heston, "by flipping the meat every 15–20 seconds, the steak will develop a crisp flavoursome exterior without being overcooked in the centre." It's very true, the steak is perfectly cooked all the way through and I can get the crusty exterior that I like.


The teriyaki sauce is added to the pan 1 minute before the end of cooking time (ie added at 3 minutes, for a medium rare steak) and allowed to boil to a viscous consistency. Do remember not to overboil the sauce (ie do not use very high heat) as the sauce will harden when cooled.  (like caramel). So, use a medium high heat after adding the sauce. It is also important to remember to rest your steaks, for at least 10 minutes, to allow the juices to spread evenly. While waiting for the steaks to rest, I made my parents this scallops with sauteed mushrooms and truffle oil (adding zest of 1 lime towards the end of cooking time) which they enjoyed immensely.

Nods of approval, with pieces of steak moving swiftly into their mouths tells me that they enjoyed the beef teriyaki that I made them. I was really happy with the results too, as the beef was very juicy. This will make an excellent quick meal (for both lunch and dinner) as it only takes 5 minutes to prepare/cook and another 10 minutes to rest.

Nice marbling



Beef teriyaki
Recipe adapted from No Recipes and Heston Blumenthal
Preparation time: 1 minute
Cooking time: 4 minutes
Serves 3

Ingredients
2 Australian Wagyu steaks (I used round steaks, approx. 320g)
2 tbsp Japanese soy sauce
2 tbsp mirin
2 tbsp sake
2 tbsp soft brown sugar
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 sprigs of parsley, to garnish


1. To make the teriyaki sauce, combine the brown sugar, mirin, sake and soy sauce in a small bowl and stir to combine.

2. Clean the steaks under running water and pat dry with kitchen towel before searing to get a nice crust. Season both sides with pepper and rub with 1/2 tbsp of extra virgin olive oil. (Do not season with salt at this point to avoid drawing the juices out from the steak)



3. In a large frying pan over high heat, add 1/2 tablespoon oil and wait until the pan/oil is smoking hot. Place the steaks in the pan, and start your timer. Depending on thickness of the steak (this guide is for 1 inch thick steak), the timings are 2 minutes each side for medium rare, 3 minutes each side for medium and 4 minutes each side for well done. Every 15-20 seconds, flip the steak. Repeat this, turning the steaks for 3 minutes for medium rare as you will need to continue cooking your steak in Step 4 for 1 minute (total of 4 minutes for medium rare). 



4. Pour the teriyaki sauce into the pan with the beef, and let it boil over medium high heat. Flip the steaks over repeatedly until the teriyaki sauce is very viscous and coats each steak in a thick shiny glaze, about 1 minute. Remove steak from pan and allow to rest for at least 10 minutes. 





5. Thinly slice the steak across the grain with a sharp knife. Drizzle the remaining teriyaki sauce onto the sliced steaks and serve. Garnish with a sprig of parsley and season steaks liberally with salt.









Scallops with sauteed mushrooms (recipe here)

Full set of photos can be viewed on my Facebook page here. 

*This recipe was featured on Asian Food Channel's FB page on 3 December 2012.

40 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thanks Mich! Love steaks as they're so simple to prepare.

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  2. I don't eat steak, but scallops with sauteed mushrooms and truffle oil sound good to me! :D

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    1. Hehe seems like more ppl favour the scallops than the beef! :P

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  3. Since I can't take beef...
    Well..hand it over the plate of plump n juicy scallops! hehehe...

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    1. Hehe! Sure sure. The scallops as easy to cook as the beef :)

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  4. Looks good...but between the two, I think I would like the scallops too. LOL!!!

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  5. Yen, i am eating with my eyes now , looks so good! Will definitely try to make this with the sauce, thanks for the detailed steps.

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    1. No probs and thanks, always happy to share the successful, delicious recipes with all. You can get Wagyu easily in Jusco nowadays.

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  6. Everything looks good (as usual)!

    Gonna try the Heston Blumenthal this weekend. I have a couple of Wagyus sitting at home from our weekend haul for the BBQ session:D Ran out of scallops...but I suppose I can pick up along the way home...

    Did you check out the lamb shoulders and cutlets stocks at U recently? Delish and good!

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    1. Oh haven't been there in a while cos no time. You should try the Heston method, it's really good. But rmbr must rest the meat afterwards.

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  7. Hi, Yen, I'm here for your scallops, yum yum! You can keep the beef, hehehe!

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    Replies
    1. LOL ok! Nobody wants my steak.. boo hoo!

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  8. NICE - sounds like I get the lions share of the beef if we dine with ur readers :-)

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    Replies
    1. OK... all is not lost, at least Hubby wants the beef! LOL.

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  9. interesting comparison between non-premium wagyu cuts and premium angus cuts. definitely something i should consider next time when choosing my beef :D

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    1. I never knew this interesting fact until I started dining at Prime and getting to know Chef Antoine. He has taught me a lot about beef!

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  10. Hehe I thought that the Japanese style of steak is not to sear the outside? Watched a youtube vid the other day by some Japanese chef who cooked his wagyu over medium heat.

    Personally I do prefer angmoh style, sear-on-maximum-heat for the "crust" though.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Ah ok, I never knew that Japanese don't sear their steaks. I've always cooked steaks on high heat since I can achieve the perfect doneness each time. Btw, this beef teriyaki doesn't really have that much of a crust, since it's soaked slightly in the teriyaki sauce towards the end of cooking.

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  11. I love Heston's method too! I won't cook steak any other way now (well provided I have time to dry age it too :) ).

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    Replies
    1. High-5! It's the one that produces the best sear without overcooking the meat ;)

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  12. I love both beef and scallops. Love the presentations and look very delicious too!

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    Replies
    1. Hooray! The beef lovers have arrived :)

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  13. I am so in love with your photos … they are breath taking and make my mouth water.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks so much! Your compliments mean a lot to me :)

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  14. This looks so good, very good, too good! I'm drooling looking at those beautiful beef, and I'm sure the sauce goes very well together with it!

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    1. LOL thanks Jasline! Your comment really made me smile. Best of all, I think this recipe is great cos it's so easy and everyone else can also recreate this in their kitchen.

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  15. Where did u buy the wagyu beef from? =D

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    1. I got mine from Jusco MidValley. I recommend that you can get the Wagyu round steak or blade steak for mid-price but still tender/flavorful beef. Of cos if you want to splurge on a more expensive cut, that's perfectly fine too :D

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  16. your steak is done so beautifully! ive never tried steak with teriyaki sauce before! I imagine it'll do quite well with each other!

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    1. Thanks dear! I guess the taste is a little bit like beef teppanyaki?

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  17. Nice work!! I didn't know about Heston's method but that's sort of what I do when I cook steaks. I like to flip them over and over every now and then. Haha... guess that means I was sort of using his method, except maybe not consistently in 15-20 seconds interval. Your steaks look gorgeous! Gave me the inspiration to cook steaks this week! hehe

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    1. Yeah before this I cook it for 2 mins one side before flipping it. Some recipes / method frown upon flipping your steaks. But since Heston is such a big name, I try his method and see and turns out it works best for me.

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  18. Heavenly pieces... I have the strong urge to bite my laptop screen when I browse through this post.. The beef (finest quality WAGYU ) looks absolutely alluring to me... I need more iron right now....;[

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    1. LOL! I think you also can make it as a quick dinner someday. Just need to get the meat and you're ready to go :)

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  19. aiyoyo such yummy pictures :)and tasty steaks. Love it :))

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  20. Missy, do you leave your wagyu come to room temps before cooking or is it fridge-to-pan directly? Excellent photos, luckily I just had dinner else I will be drooling! xx

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  21. you should set up a cooking school =)

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